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Provincial Parks

The map below shows some of the publicly accesible Provincial Parks in the Xeni Caretaker area.  This map is currently provided by BC Parks and clicking on a park will take you to the BC Parks website for more information.

Map showing parks in the Chilko River  Region 

 

Ts'il?os Provincial Park

s'il?os (pronounced "sigh-loss") Provincial Park comprises approximately 233,000 hectares of rugged mountains, clear blue lakes, glaciers, alpine meadows, and waterfalls. It is bordered by the rugged peaks of the Coast Mountains to the west, and the dry Interior Plateau to the east. The diversity and contrast in landscapes and vegetation are a result of a rainshadow effect on the east side of the mountains. While the northern and eastern portions of the park are relatively dry, the south end of Chilko Lake is characterized by moist areas of the coastal western hemlock zone.

The provincial park was established in January of 1994 as a wilderness area set aside to protect vegetation, wildlife and fish habitats, cultural values, and special features. The diverse ecosystems in the park remain largely undisturbed by human activity, making this park an ecologically significant area in the province. Chilko Lake, the largest, natural high-elevation freshwater lake in Canada, dominates the park. Stunningly beautiful, due to its blue-green hues and dramatic mountain backdrops, Chilko Lake is popular with boaters, kayakers, and anglers. Backcountry hiking and camping is also a cornerstone of the recreational opportunities offered by this remote park.

The park is managed through a cooperative relationship between BC Parks, the People of Xeni, a Local Advisory Group, and the Ts'ilʔos Advisory Group. Activities present in the area before the park's creation, and still permitted today, include hunting, trapping, and cattle grazing. The historical importance of these uses is recognized, and there is a commitment in the Cariboo-Chilcotin Land-Use Plan to ensuring that such activities continue at existing levels.

Nuntsi Provincial Park
This park, located north east of Chilko Lake in the Chilcotin Plateau, was established to protect valuable moose habitat. It encompasses abundant wetlands and small lakes.
Activities present in the area before the park's creation, and still permitted today, include hunting, trapping, and cattle grazing. The historical importance of these uses is recognized, and there is a commitment in the Cariboo-Chilcotin Land-Use Plan to ensuring that such activities continue at existing levels.

Due to the Chilko fire that occurred in July 2004, there are still closed trails. Much of the park was burnt and dead trees still pose a safety hazard as well as an access hazard. Please be advised to use Nuntsi Park with caution.

 

Bishop River Provincial Park
Bishop River Provincial Park is located at the headwaters of the Bishop River. There are no facilities and recreation opportunities are limited to backcountry hiking and camping. There are no roads into this park.


Tatlayoko Protected Area
Homathko River - Tatlayoko Protected Area comprises 17,575 hectares of diverse landscape, incorporating low elevation coastal rainforests and wetlands. Unique features of the surrounding area include the spectacular Waddington Canyon on the Homathko River, extensive icefields, and the aquamarine Tatlayoko Lake, with its impressive mountain backdrop. The Protected Area also incorporates valuable wildlife habitat, including the Mosley Creek wetlands and valley migration corridors through the Coast Range.

 Homathko River-Tatlayoko Protected Area was designated through the Cariboo Chilcotin Land Use Plan. The spectacular mountain scenery of the area offers remote recreational opportunities for the experienced backcountry user, ranging from hiking, kayaking, and mountaineering to photography and wildlife viewing.

 

The Homathko River-Tatlayoko Protected Area is a spectacular wilderness area, but is remote and access is difficult. There are no trails or roads within the Protected Area. Tatlayoko Lake is accessible by boat, and there is a road and a forestry recreation site along the eastern shore of the lake. There are boating opportunities on Tatlayoko Lake, and consistent afternoon thermal winds also create good windsurfing conditions. The Homathko River is considered too dangerous for canoeists, kayakers, or rafters.